Citation
J Haem Pract 2016; 3(1):67-70. doi: 10.17225/jhp00060

Authors: Sharon Alavian, Wendy Hutchinson

Sharon Alavian
Clinical Nurse Specialist Haemostasis
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, Haemophilia centre, Du Cane Road, London W12 0HS. Email: Sharon.alavian@imperial.nhs.uk

Wendy Hutchinson
Clinical Nurse Specialist Haemostasis
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, Haemophilia centre, Du Cane Road, London W12 0HS. Email: Wendy.hutchinson@imperial.nhs.uk

Abstract

Hypertension is a well-known risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular events. Globally, there is a drive to try to reduce salt intake. In an older population, where hypertension is likely to have a high prevalence, are health care professionals aware of the sodium content in replacement factor?

Acknowledgements

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

References

  1. Makris M. Prophylaxis in haemophilia should be life-long. Blood Transfusion 2012; 10(2): 165-58.
  2. World Federation of Haemophilia. About bleeding disorders: frequently asked questions. 2012. Available from http://www.wfh.org/en/page.aspx?pid=637#Life_expectancy (accessed July 2015).
  3. Blood Pressure Association. Blood pressure chart. 2008. Available from http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/BloodPressureandyou/Thebasics/Bloodpressurechart (accessed 14 September 2015).
  4. Fransen van de Putte DE, Fischer K, Makris M et al. Increased prevalence of hypertension in haemophilia patients. Thromb Haemostasis 2012; 108(4):750-55.
  5. Von Drygalski A, Kolaitis NA, Bettencourt R et al. Prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in hemophilia. American Heart Association 2013; 62: 209-15.
  6. World Heart Foundation. Stroke. 2015. Available from http://www.worldheart-federation.org/cardiovascular-health/stroke/ (accessed 1 August 2015).
  7. US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Classification of blood pressure. In: The seventh report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. 2004. Available from http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/files/docs/guidelines/jnc7full.pdf (accessed 25 September 2015).
  8. World Action on Salt and Health. Salt and blood pressure. 2010. Available from http://www.worldactiononsalt.com/salthealth/factsheets/bloodpressure/index.html (accessed 1 August 2015).
  9. Sheehen K. Different names for sodium in food. Available from http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/different-names-sodium-food-2141.html (accessed 1 August 2015).
  10. World Health Organization. Guideline: Sodium intake for adults and children. 2012. Available from http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/guidelines/sodium_intake_printversion.pdf (accessed 1 August 2015).
  11. Canadian Liver Foundation. Sodium guidelines. 2015. Available from http://www.liver.ca/liver-disease/having-liver-disease/healthy-livingguidelines/sodium-guidelines.aspx (accessed 8 August 2015).
  12. The Medical Letter. Salt restriction: from The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. J Am Med Assoc 2014; 33(21): 2229. Available from http://jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1877204 (accessed 11 August 2015).
  13. He FJ, Jiafu L, MacGregor GA. Effect of longer term modest salt reduction on blood pressure. Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. Br Med J 2003; 346: 1325. Available from http://www.bmj.com/content/346/bmj.f1325 (accessed 12 August 2015).
  14. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Prevention of cardiovascular disease. NICE public health guidance 25. 2010. Available from http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph25/resources/guidanceprevention-of-cardiovascular-disease-pdf (accessed 11 August 2015).
  15. Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Best practice guidelines on the labelling and packaging of medicines. 2012. Available from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/328404/Best_practice_guidance_on_the_labelling_and_packaging_of_medicines.pdf (accessed 13 August 2015).
  16. British Heart Foundation. The truth about salt and medicines. 2013. Available from https://www.bhf.org.uk/heart-matters-magazine/news/behind-the-headlines/salt-in-medicines (accessed 11 August 2015).
  17. Blood Pressure UK. Why potassium helps to lower blood pressure. 2008. Available from http://www.bloodpressureuk.org/microsites/salt/Home/Whypotassiumhelps (accessed 12 August 2015).
  18. Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition. Salt and Health. 2003. Available from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/338782/SACN_Salt_and_Health_report.pdf (accessed 11 August 2015).

The Journal of Haemophilia Practice is published by Haemnet.

Haemnet is a registered charity that brings together and gives a voice to haemophilia nurses, physiotherapists and allied health care professionals, providing forums for collaborative research, educational activities and support.